Ellaberry Gardens
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Spring Planting Chart

Ellaberry Gardens' Spring Planting Chart


A note on all of my planting charts: this isn't rocket science and it's most definitely not an exact science.  I often plant early or later than suggested by up to 10-14 days depending on weather, available garden space or life in general.  Give yourself some room around these dates.  They are simply suggested and a best case scenario.  In other words, it's not real life.  ;)  Have fun and don't stress!

Know also that these dates are what I use in my own garden. My system of planting is based on two-week intervals simply because it's what works for me and so my harvests aren't all at once.  For instance, beets can be planted anytime from March 1st - April 15th.  You could plant all your spring beets on March 1st or April 15th or plant some every few days for four weeks. Plan your own planting based on what works best for you.   



Seed = to be started in place in your gardens outside
 T = transplant (so must be started 6-8 weeks prior to the planting date inside or purchased at planting time)
 



 

 February 15th

 March 1st

March 15th 

April 1st 

 April 15th

Beets   

 Seed

 Seed

 Seed

 Seed

Broccoli  

 T

 T

 T

 
Cabbage  

 T

 T

 T

 
Carrots

 Seed

 Seed

 Seed

   
Cauliflower  

 T

 T

   

Celery

 T

 T

 T

   
Cilantro  

 Seed

 Seed

   
Collards  

Seed or T

Seed or T

Seed or T

Seed or T

Corn, early    

 Seed

 Seed

 Seed

Dill  

 Seed

 Seed

 Seed

 
Garlic

 Cloves

 Cloves

 Cloves

   
Kale

 Seed

 Seed

 Seed

   
Leeks

 T

 T

 T

   
Lettuce  

Seed or T

Seed or T

Seed or T

Seed or T

Onions

 Seed

Seed or T

Seed or T

 T

 T

Parsley  

 Seed

 Seed

 Seed

 Seed

Parsnips

 Seed

 Seed

 Seed

   
Peas

 Seed

 Seed

     
Radish  

 Seed

 Seed

 Seed

 Seed

Rutabaga

 Seed

 Seed

 Seed

   
Shallots  

 Cloves

 Cloves

   
Spinach

 Seed

 Seed

 Seed

 Seed

 Seed

Swiss Chard  

 Seed

 Seed

   
Turnips and/or Mustard Greens  

 Seed

 Seed

 Seed

 Seed

Turnips  

 Seed

 Seed

 Seed

 Seed


Irish potatoes weren't included in this chart but our spring planting schdedule for them is Valentine's Day to St. Patrick's Day!


Special Notes on Onions

When you go to buy onions, you’ll be faced with choosing between seeds, plants or sets.  Seeds are the best choice for the biggest, fattest bulbs but really do better when planted in the fall and left to overwinter and ripen the following spring/summer.  Onion plants (the bundles of little “green onions”) you see in the stores are the second choice. These are basically little transplants that just need to go into the ground to continue growing.  The onion sets look like bags of tiny onions and are my last choice and here’s why.  These are really tiny onions that are already mature.  They’re grown by large producers in extremely close quarters so they don’t get very big.  When you put them in your garden, they’d rather produce a flower than produce a fat bulb (because they think they’re already done growing!) so you have to watch them very, very closely to prevent them from flowering.  Pinch back any flowering stems as soon as you see them.  They’re pretty obvious because you’ll see a sturdier green stem shoot straight up from the middle of the plant.  Pinch it back or your bulb will quit growing!   Onions grown from sets also don't store as well so if you're growing onions to store in your pantry/root cellar, be aware of this.
 
*If you want to start your transplants from seed, you'll need to be ready by the first week of January.  I typically put up the Christmas decorations and get out the seed starting stuff!


 







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