Ellaberry Gardens
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2010 Newsletter Archive

(2010 Newsletter Archive: May - October....that's all she wrote!)

Ellaberry Gardens' May 2010 Newsletter

May of 2010 has been an exciting month. Our snap peas are finally producing. We've pulled our first turnips and carrots. We're harvesting strawberries nearly every day. We had enough strawberries this year to can a small batch of strawberry jam from our own berries this year. Very exciting! While discussing this, we realized that our youngest child who is nearly 10 has never had anything other than home-canned jams and jellies on his peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and his biscuits. Made me happy. And worried that he's a little too sheltered. Time will tell. By the way, follow this link to the Oklahoma Food Coop and buy the best peanut butter from Snider Farms you have EVER had!

We also started this business in May. It's a scary thing to put yourself out there. I catch myself wondering if I know enough to be of assistance to anyone else. I'm not sure I do most of the time but I am sure that I want to try and help other people experience some of the joy we have experienced by growing something that makes you smile---be it a tomato, a turnip or a sunflower. It can be scary to plant potatoes and have no idea what's going to be waiting for you under the soil when you go to harvest in July. It's a leap of faith. Here I go jumping!

Thoughts on Helping vs. Doing

I've been thinking a lot about that old "give a man a fish" story lately. I don't want to give people fish. I want to help them build fishing poles and show them where the very best worms live.
I started this thinking that installing gardens for people would be my favorite because I would be touching more dirt. I'm finding that working with people is way more fulfilling than any dirt digging could ever be. Who knew? Isn't it fabulous to always find yourself learning new things. I am constantly finding myself curiouser and curiouser. (I know it's not a real word...but it makes me happy.) So, let's work together to get you growing!

Ellaberry's Edible Garden Tour 2011

Each spring brings with it the wonderful garden tours available to us in Tulsa. We have habitat gardens to wander through, water gardens to linger within and the meticulous marvels of our area master gardeners. What we don't have is a tour for those of us who want to see how other people are growing their own food in the city. Let's get one going! I'm aiming for this time next year...May 2011.

So, if you or someone you know is growing food and you'd like to participate, please contact us and tell us about what you have going on at your place!

Coming Soon! Plants for Sale

As soon as we get our grower's license back from the State Dept of Ag, we'll have beautiful plants to offer you. We'll have native elderberries, native blackberries, a few strawberries, marigolds, native primrose, columbines, and more!

We're working hard to get ready for the summer sowing of broccoli, cabbage, collards, kale, cauliflower and lettuces for our fall gardens. We'll have plenty to share at very reasonable prices. Watch the site for updates!

If you'd like to sign up for an email version of our monthly newsletter, send us an email at
ellaberrygardens@yahoo.com with only "newsletter" in the subject line!

Thanks!

Happy growing!

Jenny

Ellaberry Gardens' June 2010 Newsletter

June is always an exciting time in the garden. All the teeny plants that have been so lovingly nurtured for weeks are finally responding and growing by leaps and bounds. The efforts are paying off and it all makes sense again. I get nervous in the early spring when all the work I have put in isn't quite yet tangible. Yet, in June, a corner is turned and all of the sudden I begin to realize (again...this happens each year) that I just might be really doing something valuable. I'm finally bringing in enough fresh food to prepare entire meals! One of my current spring favorites is to dice up new potatoes, diced turnips and spring onions and fry them up in some olive oil with lots of pepper. We need about 3 lbs of the potato/turnip mix for our family of 6. Serve with some fresh scrambled or fried eggs and you've got a fabulously nourishing and simple meal produced entirely on a city lot. What a feeling. Such a sense of peace and accomplishment.

As if finally profiting from my late winter and early spring work isn't enough, the tomato plants are full of baby green tomatoes that promise fresh salsas and tasty sauces. The bush cherries are nearly lying on the ground from the weight of their teeny green fruits waiting to ripen into sweet-tart juicy redness. Fruit is hanging heavy from the peach, plum, and pear trees. We have two young apple trees. One tree has yet to bloom and one has 2 whole apples on it. Even that wee duo elicits fantasies of apple butters and pies. We just planted two new apricot trees last week. Even in their infant state, I can imagine filling my dehydrator with sweet fruits for winter gnoshing. This sense of "what could be" keeps me going in a very hopeful frame of mind most of the time.

As excited and hopeful as I tend to be this time of year, I am still faced with pests and diseases and Mother Nature (which also abound in June.) All of these components of gardening lend themselves to building up quite a strong constitution while still staying soft enough not to miss a single petal or ladybug larvae (did you know they look like little alligators?) You face the possibility of hundreds of pounds of produce for your family or the possibility of losing everything you've planted to some environmental mishap (be it bugs, fungus or hail.) There's nothing that keeps me more humble and continually reminds me of my insignificant place in this big, big world.

Thoughts on Kids and Gardening

I have four babies. They don't particularly like to garden. Ok, they don't like it at all. And I don't make them help me. When people come over and exclaim to my 3 teenage daughters, "Do you know how cool this is?"...they just giggle. When my wee son is asked, "Do you help your mom in the garden?"...he merely grumbles. He might even roll his eyes. Or remind me that he'd just love to have an empty yard to kick a soccer ball in. Most of the time, they'd just rather go to Taco Bell.
Yet, each year, around June, they start saying things like, "Mom, when will we have a watermelon?" You might hear one of them say, "Those tomatoes from the store didn't taste that good. When will ours be ready?" I have even heard one of them tell a friend, "My mom grows the best broccoli!"

My oldest daughter is drawn outside with her camera to capture the seasonal shifts in minute, glorious detail (that even I, on my hands and knees and face to face with my plants, don't always see.) My middle daughter reminds me every now and then that she doesn't mind helping me outside and does so willingly. My youngest daughter once said, "I think the other yards in our neighborhood must look at ours and be so sad because they're so boring." My son valiantly protects our beds from any child or maruading dog who might accidentally trample on them.
My garden is my JOY thing and I've told my kids that if they can't bring joy outside with them, then to keep their grumpy butts inside. But, I have to tell you....even if they bring their grumpy butts outside, they typically go back in a little more joyful. For me, this is enough. I've planted a seed

Ellaberry's Edible Garden Tour 2011

Each spring brings with it the wonderful garden tours available to us in Tulsa. We have habitat gardens to wander through, water gardens to linger within and the meticulous marvels of our area master gardeners. What we don't have is a tour for those of us who want to see how other people are growing their own food in the city. Let's get one going! I'm aiming for next spring...May 2011.

So, if you or someone you know is growing food and you'd like to participate, please contact us and tell us about what you have going on at your place!

Coming Soon! Plants for Sale

As soon as we get our grower's license back from the State Dept of Ag, we'll have beautiful plants to offer you. We'll have native elderberries, native blackberries, a few strawberries, marigolds, native primrose, columbines, and more!

We're working hard to get ready for the summer sowing of broccoli, cabbage, collards, kale, cauliflower and lettuces for our fall gardens. We'll have plenty to share at very reasonable prices. Watch the site for updates! If you already know you want some of these, feel free to send us a note so we can make sure and sow plenty!

Thanks and happy growing!

Jenny

Ellaberry Gardens' July 2010 Newsletter

"Cultivators of the earth are the most virtuous and independent citizens." ~~~Thomas Jefferson

Happy Independence Day! I hate to rely on such a cliche but can you even believe it's already July!? Our summer gardens are producing heavily now. I'm bringing in tomatoes and at least a cucumber or two nearly every day. I've cleaned off our plum tree and one peach tree and harvested over 7 pounds of bush cherries. I've brought in over 20 pounds of onions. A big pile of them is staring at me from the table waiting to be chopped, sliced and diced for the freezer and the dehydrator. I have another large pile of red onions sunning on the front walk where I'm drying out Swiss Chard that I let go to seed. I've seeded broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, kale and brussels sprouts for winter and early spring eating. I just can't emphasize enough how wonderful it feels to grow at least some of your own food. And even though it is a wonderful feeling to grow food, I don't think we should ever forget that it is a basic right to know how to feed yourself. During the month in which we celebrate our freedom and our independence, I think it might be valuable to consider how free, as a people, we really are if we have entirely abdicated the production of our food...our daily bread...to big corporations and huge agribusiness. I believe it's something to very seriously consider. Stepping off my soap box.....

Back to it already being July, I am perplexed at the speed at which time is flying by (agan, somewhat cliche but true, nonetheless.) Although being a gardener continually helps me with mindfulness and patience, it also makes me painfully aware of the speed at which the seasons come and go. I follow the changing months and seasons, the first and last frost dates, the "proper" dates to sow and transplant more than I follow any other measurement of time progression. I may or may not know what time it is in any given day if you ask, but I can tell you what I should be planting and how many weeks until our first frost. It's July and I'm already planning how much food to plant for us to eat from November until about March. I am thankful for the mindful patience I am learning. I really am. But I am struggling with the lessons I'm learning about my place, our place, in the whole scheme of things. It's a relief on my best days. I find myself willing to take risks in my garden that others may not because I feel like I have a pretty good grip on the passage of time...if something fails, next July will be here really, really quickly and it won't really matter. On my worst days, I feel a little lost and find myself wondering if one gardener can really make a difference. But even on those days, I find myself still poking seeds into the earth and wandering my garden paths...just in case even a teeny difference can be made.

Thoughts on Planning Your Garden

I've spoken with several folks lately who are ready to begin gardening but who just can't make that first leap because they're afraid they'll do something wrong. Some of these folks have already built and filled raised beds. But they're afraid they don't have a good enough plan or they don't have a plan at all and don't know where to begin. To them I say, "Get over it and get growing!" Don't get me wrong. I believe in planning...you should see my plans. However, if not having a plan is the only reason you're not growing something, get over it! Buy a plant or a package of seeds and get them in the ground! If you finally plant something, you break that "I'll-do-it-when-I-have-a-plan" spell and you have begun. After that, it's not so scary. And, by the way, there is no "right" when it comes to gardening. There's what works best in your own garden. But you'll never find out what that is if you don't just plant something! Get growing! Then make a plan to keep growing!

Ellaberry Gardens' Open House/Potluck: September 12, 2010, 2pm - ?
9641 E 26th Pl, Tulsa, OK

We would like to cordially invite you and anyone you would like to bring along to Ellaberry Gardens' first open house! Come see our gardens, our fruit trees, and our chickens and stay for a chat! If you'd like to hang around for an evening meal, we'll have a potluck supper at about 6pm so bring something to share (and maybe a chair or two!) We're certainly no demonstration garden. We're a real working garden and things look great some months and not so great others. There is a constant transition. I plan on having an open house a couple of times a year so you can get a real sense of what this might look like in your own yard. Come join us!

Mark your calendars!!!!

Ellaberry's Edible Garden Tour 2011

Each spring brings with it the wonderful garden tours available to us in Tulsa. We have habitat gardens to wander through, water gardens to linger within and the meticulous marvels of our area master gardeners. What we don't have is a tour for those of us who want to see how other people are growing their own food in the city. Let's get one going! I'm aiming for next spring...May 2011. We have my yard and one other nearly for sure. I'd like to have at least 4 or 5.

So, if you or someone you know is growing food in the city and you'd like to participate, please contact us and tell us about what you have going on at your place! I'm also looking for vendors to be in each driveway so contact me if you have something relevant you'd like to set up and sell!

Thanks so much for your continued support and happy growing!

Jenny

Ellaberry Gardens' August 2010 Newsletter
 
"Hope is itself a species of happiness, and perhaps, the chief happiness which this world affords."~~~Samuel Johnson

August has arrived bringing with it the triple digit temperatures that most of us Okies expect August to show up with. Even though I know it's coming, it's always so surprising to me how hot it really feels out there. In the "About Us" section of the website, I wrote that I love gardening in Oklahoma, "even in August." As the oppressive temperatures and humidity arrive yet again, I find myself wondering what it is about gardening in the heat of Oklahoma summers that I love. It's definitely not the biting flies. It's definitely not watching my spring planted eggplants, peppers and tomatoes try to decide if holding onto the last of their spring and summer fruits or staying alive is more important. It's definitely not keeping up with the watering, weeding and fertilizing no matter how much I'm sweating. What could I possibly love about this? I do love the produce we bring in and eat. But is that really enough to keep me out there? The farmers' markets are abundant with fresh foods that I could just go and buy. What is it that keeps me out in the heat and so motivated not to give up?

After giving it some thought, I've decided that what I love about August is that it not only brings triple digit temps, but it brings with it a completely new, fresh second chance in the garden. When the spring tomatoes are struggling in the heat, the last of the bolting broccoli has been pulled and fed to the chickens and the cucmbers are looking tired, it's ok. Fall tomatoes have been planted, new cucumbers have been seeded (ok, not yet but they will be this week) and small, healthy broccoli (and cauliflower, kale, and brussels sprouts) transplants are waiting in my planting shelves to be moved outside. So even though August seems miserable in so many ways, it also signals a new beginning. Sure, there are extra precautions to be taken to sheild seedlings from the heat and the summer bugs. But just when things seem to be completely giving up, August brings with it the notion that the biggest harvest ever might just be around the corner. August is all about hope and endless possibilites for the fall garden. Hope is a powerful motivator. Being hopeful feels better than nearly any other emotion I have experienced. And August is nothing if it's not hopeful.

See the OSU Extension Fact Sheet HLA - 6009, "Fall Gardening", here and I dare you to read it and not experience an abundance of hope about what you can do in your gardens in August!

Thoughts on Resources and Gardening

(Warning: The next two paragraphs teeter very close to the edge of opinionated, ranting, soap box-like, preachy dogma. I would apologize but I wouldn't mean it. However, I absolutely do not intend to offend a single soul. If you know me, you'll hear my voice when you read this and know the good intentions it was written with. If you don't, you'll just have to trust in my good intentions.)

We all have very finite resources of time, money and energy. We all make choices about how to spend our time, our money and our energy. Growing some of our own food is a choice that I make about how to spend my resources. I don't spend much time doing stuff besides raising our family, growing a garden and hanging out with my husband planning our next great and ridiculous homesteading project. It seems to me that other people spend way more time out in the world going to movies, shopping, eating out, and whatever it is that people do when they aren't at home. I would guess that most of what people do also involves spending their money and their energy. We do some of those things. But not often. Here's how I see it. If you really want a garden, you'll have one. I find truth to be very freeing. Just be honest with yourself. If you want a garden, grow one. If you don't, let it go.

There's no moral highground to be had here. I just have recently found myself frustrated at people telling me they don't have the time or the money or the energy and then head out in a $200 outfit for a $50 dinner, a movie at $8 a ticket and have a $5 coffee on the way home. I've also had people tell me they don't have time to raise food but they are taking care of enormous flower beds and spending a lot of time mowing, fertilizing, and weeding lawns. It's all about your choices. How about, "I don't grow food because I just don't want to." How freeing is that? And you know what else, that's ok. But please don't belittle my life by telling me I can only do this because I don't have "real" job or because my husband has a "good" job (not something I'm even sure we believe in) or because I have lots of energy. I do this because I simply made a choice to spend my own very finite resources this way.

If on the other hand, you really want to garden and you just don't know where to begin, send me an email and I'll tell you how we started for not a penny or how you can spend good money and get some awesome beds. I'll also tell you all about our front yard raised beds that cost me not more than $10 each. Or how we built our chicken house from pallets scavanged from a lumber yard's parking lot. I can also tell you about getting some free blackberry and elderberry for your yard. Or how I got $5 fruit trees. How's that instead of a cup of coffee?

Just a final note: it has been said that for every $20 you invest in a garden, you'll make $200 back in food. Something to think about.

Ellaberry Gardens' Open House/Potluck: September 12, 2010, 2pm - ?
9641 E 26th Pl, Tulsa, OK

We would like to cordially invite you and anyone you would like to bring along to Ellaberry Gardens' first open house! Come see our gardens, our fruit trees, and our chickens and stay for a chat! If you'd like to hang around for an evening meal, we'll have a potluck supper at about 6pm so bring something to share (and maybe a chair or two!) We're certainly no demonstration garden. We're a real working garden and things look great some months and not so great others. There is a constant transition. I plan on having an open house a couple of times a year so you can get a real sense of what this might look like in your own backyard (and front yard, of course!) Come join us! Mark your calendars!!!!

Ellaberry's Edible Garden Tour 2011

Each spring brings with it the wonderful garden tours available to us in Tulsa. We have habitat gardens to wander through, water gardens to linger within and the meticulous marvels of our area master gardeners. What we don't have is a tour for those of us who want to see how other people are growing their own food in the city. Let's get one going! I'm aiming for next spring...May 2011. We have my yard and one other nearly for sure. I'd like to have at least 4 or 5.

So, if you or someone you know is growing food in the city and you'd like to participate, please contact us and tell us about what you have going on at your place! I'm also looking for vendors to be in each driveway so contact me if you have something relevant you'd like to set up and sell!

Thanks so much for your continued support and happy growing!

Jenny

Ellaberry Gardens' September 2010 Newsletter

Here at Ellaberry Gardens we're greeting the cooler temps with extreme gratitude. This is the first year that the heat almost convinced me to only garden in the spring and fall. I hung in there but some of my crops, not so much.

Mother Nature loves to teach a good lesson. The first year I decide to turn my urban homesteading venture into a small business helping others learn more about growing food, she schooled me hard. The spring dampness and the intense summer heat (and probably some of my own practices) caused me to lose my early potatoes, many tomato plants, and caused my peppers and eggplants to, thus far, have ridiculously low production. My butternut squash, the only squash I grow because it has a bit of natural immunity to the dreaded squash bugs and squash vine borers, was attacked by both squash bugs and vine borers this year. I had to pull the vines a good two months before I was ready (and only ended up with 17 lbs of butternut squash...which is about 1/4 of what I'd like to have had going into the winter.) My oldest peach tree has a horrid borer infestation as well. I'm not sure it's gonna make it.

But that's ok. Because Mother Nature's lessons are all valuable. I learned that in my damp backyard (water retention issue), I need to give my plants a little more breathing room. I learned that my ability to see hope even in the face of adversity is absolutely intact. When I was clearing the butternut squash vines, I kept telling myself it was ok because my sweet potatoes are doing so well and they have nearly the same food value. But you know what? If they fail, that'll be ok too. I was reminded by this summer's gardening experience (and my friend Cheri) that every lesson in the garden is a good one. Besides, now I have lots of open space to get a great start on my fall garden!

As someone who offers gardening classes and helps others design and install gardens, it is good to have these experiences under my belt. If I had only experienced bountiful, healthful crops, I would have no personal experience to pull from when my customers/students needed my help. And no book, article, online source or fact sheet is nearly as good as experiencing something in your garden yourself! Plus, on a personal note, more humility in most of us is a good thing.

Thoughts on The Right Way to Garden

Gardeners are a diverse bunch. There are those who garden for the sense of accomplishment. There are those who garden for the sake of simple curiosity...they want to see what they can do. There are those who garden because if they don't, their family has no produce to eat. There are those who garden because their parents and grandparents did and they don't know how not to. There are those who garden because they use it as therapy. There are probably those who combine all of the above. There are as many ways to grow a garden as there are people who want to grow one.

However, I have met numerous folks that claim there is only one right method to garden; there is only one right way to acquire seeds and plants; there is only one right way to deal with garden waste; and there is only one right way to feed/fertilize and treat diseases and insects. Well, to them I say, "HOGWASH!"

While I openly support organic growing practices and believe whole-heartedly in methods that preserve our soil and seeds for future generations, I refuse to try and scare people into doing anything by stating there is only one right way (plus it's just not true)! Fear is not sustainable. LOVE and JOY are sustainable. And they feel good. Gardening has to feel good and be full of love and joy...not fear...or people will not keep at it!

So, if it makes you just as happy as can be to flip your flops into Wallyworld in the spring and buy seeds, dirt and tools, knock yourself out and grow away. At least you're growing something and that's an amazing act in itself...no matter how you do it! And if you can't believe that I said that because you would never do such a thing, I suspect you're doing something that most of us would never do either! Just sayin'. It's a big, big world. There's room for everyone. Relax.

Ellaberry Gardens' 1st Open House!!! Mark Your Calendars Now!!!

Everyone is cordially invited to our place, 9641 E 26th Pl, Tulsa, OK on Sunday, September 12th! We'll "open up" at 2pm for those who just want to wander and visit and maybe ask a question or two. We'll have a pot luck supper at 6pm for those who really want to linger! Come tour the gardens, ask about raising chickens in the city, get to know some other folks from the area who are interested in growing food, share a meal and relax around the fire pit! Bring your spouse, your partner, your friends, your neighbors and your kiddos but no pets, please. If you think you might be coming, drop me an email so I can make sure we don't run out of cold drinks! 
ellaberrygardens@yahoo.com

Ellaberry's Edible Garden Tour 2011

Each spring brings with it the wonderful garden tours available to us in Tulsa. We have habitat gardens to wander through, water gardens to linger within and the meticulous marvels of our area master gardeners. What we don't have is a tour for those of us who want to see how other people are growing their own food in the city. Let's get one going! I'm aiming for next spring...May 2011. We have my yard and one other nearly for sure. I'd like to have at least 4 or 5.
So, if you or someone you know is growing food in the city and you'd like to participate, please contact us and tell us about what you have going on at your place! I'm also looking for vendors to be in each driveway so contact me if you have something relevant you'd like to set up and sell!

Thanks so much for your continued support and happy growing!

Jenny

Ellaberry Gardens' October 2010 Newsletter

"Hope begins in the dark, the stubborn hope that if you just show up and try to do the right thing, the dawn will come. You wait and watch and work: You don't give. up."~~~Anne Lammott

I apologize for the delay in getting the newsletter out this month. I had some serious thinking to do about how to proceed. October is typically one of my favorite times of the year. The breezes no longer move as quietly through the trees as the leaves dry and sing their last songs before they give up and float to the ground. And the nights finally become cool. Something about sleeping with the windows open while snuggling under a pile of blankets is affirming and reassuring. I typically start thinking about the wonderful fall goodies I love to cook and bake. I also start planning for holiday crafting and gift-giving. But this particular October brings with it some sadness and transition as well.

I am taking a temporary sabbatical from teaching classes and doing garden design. I need a season to regroup, reassess, reorganize and prioritize. Those of you who know me best know what I'm going through and your thoughts, blessings, prayers, and concern are welcome and very much appreciated. To everyone, thank you so much for your support and know that I'm not going anywhere. This business means very much to me. I have met many fabulous folks over the last year and I am not letting those connections go. I will be back after the first of the year for the winter classes. I just need some time. I thank you for your understanding. If you don't mind, please send healing thoughts, blessings and prayers for my marriage, my children and for me. I will surely feel them heading my way and will send much thanks back in return.

Thoughts on the Realities of Urban Homesteading

I have been recently reminded that living this life...growing food, having backyard chickens, hanging clothes to dry, reducing/reusing/recycling, being mindful of expenditures, paying attention to where your food comes from (especially meat and dairy), preserving seasonal produce, finding an afternoon of doing "nothing" more appealing than doing nearly anything else, never wanting to go anywhere because you can find yourself lost in the universe contained in every square foot of your own backyard.....can be overwhelming and disheartening to other people. I am definitely a force to be reckoned with. I have such a vision of what this could be that sometimes I don't pay attention to what it is. I don't live alone. I have five other people in my home who have their own visions of what a life well-lived looks like. It can be frustrating when those ideas seem so opposite and then add to that your outrage that others don't see the inherent value in what you're doing and, whoa, you're in a pickle!

If you take on this journey, or even just a small part of it, please don't forget to be mindful of those who you love. It's so easy to take on an air of superiority when what you find valuable also seems valuable to society at large. For instance, I love this life. I can find nearly no flaws in living this way. But others seem to be finding it constraining, overwhelming and that it actually makes their lives harder instead of easier. Who knew? Just make sure to have really honest conversations with those who will be benefitting from any part of an urban homesteading life you decide to take on. Any new endeavor starts out exciting. But eventually the work/chore/labor reality hits hard.

Know who's on board before you begin. Remind yourself who's on board as you continue to expand. Remind yourself who's on board when you're the only one out there busting your butt. If you really believe in the value of what you're doing, keep doing it. But also know that you just might be out there all by yourself. But then you don't have to feel bad when you crack open a ripe cantaloupe and devour the entire thing out in the garden and never tell anyone how delicious it was.

Open House Thank You!

To all of you who made it out to our open house/garden tour/potluck supper, THANK YOU! I hope to make this an annual tradition! And thanks to Miss Marilyn who sang to us with such honest beauty! I love you, Marilyn!!! And Nicole, those gluten-free goodies you brought were fabulous...the kids loved them! Recipes, please!

Thanks to Orman, Kathie and family, Mary and family, Nicole and family, Carol and Roseanne, Elisabeth and family, Guy and Sharon and the couple from the Oklahoma Food Coop whose names I cannot remember (sorry!) for coming and spending time with me and my family. There are others whose names I didn't catch at all and I'm sorry. Thanks for coming anyway! Thanks to Nancy and DeWayne, Elizabeth and Gary, RaeAnne and her beautiful boy, Devin, Marilyn and my momma for spending the evening with us and sharing food and song! And a special thank you to my sweet children (those by birth and some by heart)...Molly, Kyla, Rachel, Aren, Tyler, Shawn, Bryce, Kendall and Margie. And thanks to Chris for helping me get things ready.

Ellaberry's Edible Garden Tour 2011

Each spring brings with it the wonderful garden tours available to us in Tulsa. We have habitat gardens to wander through, water gardens to linger within and the meticulous marvels of our area master gardeners. What we don't have is a tour for those of us who want to see how other people are growing their own food in the city. Let's get one going! I'm aiming for next spring...May 2011. We have my yard and two others. I'd like to have at least 4 or 5.

So, if you or someone you know is growing food in the city and you'd like to participate, please contact us and tell us about what you have going on at your place! I'm also looking for vendors to be in each driveway so contact me if you have something relevant you'd like to set up and sell!

Thanks so much for your continued support and happy growing!

Jenny

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